Early Atomic Era Artifacts

Teapot with Fused Debris from Little Boy Bomb Blast over Hiroshima

V1
V2
V3
V4

Teapot with Fused Debris from Little Boy Bomb Blast Over Hiroshima

Description: This small piece of pottery was collected in Hiroshima by a soldier from Australia in the British Commonwealth Occupation Force. It appears to be a teapot that bent and collapsed inward due to the extreme heat and force of the blast with debris fusing onto its surface. Portions of the debris-covered surface of the teapot still show a slight elevated level of radioactivity versus background radiation (about 10%). Analysis by a Gamma spectrometer indicates the presence of isotopes of Europium associated with neutron radiaition from the blast.

Not for Sale


DaiNippon Brewery Bottle Melted by Hiroshima Blast

Bottle 2

Bottle 1

DaiNippon Brewery Bottle Melted by Hiroshima Blast

Description: This bottle was purchased by a soldier stationed in Hiroshima after the war from a man who was selling bomb blast artifacts. The melting of the glass can be clearly seen. 

Not for Sale


Melted Glass Window Fragment with Inclusions from Hiroshima Blast

glass-3_med
Glass 5
glass-3_med

Melted Glass Window Fragment with Inclusions from Hiroshima Blast

Description: This fragment of glass was collected by a soldier in the US occupation force stationed near Hiroshima. This soldier reports that he was walking around the “perimeter" of the atomic blast.  As he went into a building that was mostly intact, he saw what he described as melted glass "icicles" hanging from a window.  This fragment is a piece of one of the icicles. 

As would be expected, one side of the glass is an unusual almost smooth white texture, due to the instant effects of the intense heat from the blast. Charred wood, presumably from the window frame, can be seen inside the glass. As with the melted teapot above, analysis of the smooth, white side of the glass fragment using a Gamma spectrometer also indicates the presence of isotopes of Europium associated with neutron radiaition from the blast.

Not for Sale


Ash Encased in Glass Bubble Collected in Hiroshima between August and September of 1945

G1

G2

Ash Encased in Glass Bubble Collected in Hiroshima between August and September of 1945

Description: This highly unusual and rare fragment of glass was collected between August and September of 1945, according to papers of the solider who collected it. The melt pattern of the glass clearly shows the intensity of the heat generated by the Little Boy Uranium bomb. 

A Gamma spectrometer indicates the presence of isotopes of Europium associated with neutron radiaition from the blast. Geiger counter readings show only very minimal radiation above background levels. As shown elsewhere on this site, Trinitite from the first Plutonium bomb test in New Mexico does show elevated levels of radiation above background. This is because “The Gadget” was detonated 100 feet above ground (in July of 1945), whereas Little Boy was detonated 1900 feet above Hiroshima (in August of 1945) and fallout was dispersed into the atmosphere.

This is the only known sample to contain ash particles - suspended in the glass - that was collected immediately after the bombing of Hiroshima. 

Not for Sale


Unknown Fragment with Fused Debris from Hiroshima Blast

H 1a
H 2a
H 3a
Kiyoshi
Signature

Unknown Fragment with Fused Debris from Hiroshima Blast

Description: This fragment of perhaps some type of conduit has melted debris fused to its exterior. It passed through the Hiroshima Survivor Kiyoshi Kikkawa's famous souvenir shop which was near the Dome. It is about 2” in length.

As with the other artifacts above, analysis of the fragment using a Gamma spectrometer also indicates the presence of isotopes of Europium associated with neutron radiaition from the blast.

Not for Sale


Custom-Made Atomic Bomb Viewer from the Manhattan Project

1
2
3
4
5

Custom-Made Atomic Bomb Viewer from the Manhattan Project

Description: This viewer was made for observers to “safely” view an atomic bomb blast, with its intense release of energy in the form of visible light that was brighter than the sun (only a portion of the energy released by the bomb). The viewer looks and feels heavy and weighs about 4.5 pounds. It seems very well constructed. This device is unique in that it is not the standard goggles typically seen in photos or film records of the project. Note - this device should not be used to view the sun as its exact optical specifications are not known. 

Price: $450 Shipping: $25


Commemorative Coin from Project Gasbuggy Underground Nuclear Test Site

Commemorative Coin from Project Gasbuggy Underground Nuclear Test Site

Description: Rare are unique coin that was at the blast site during the Project Gasbuggy underground nuclear test. This was an attempt at “nuclear tracking” which did release natural gas however it was too radioactive to use. As noted on the backside of the coin, the test took place on December 10, 1967. The coin is reportedly discolored due to the blast itself. A few of these coins were located at the site, and then after the blast encased in lucite. This cube reads background levels of radiation.  Some of the coins were in fact bent, and the discoloration is apparently due to the effects of the blast itself. Here is a link on Youtube to Project Gasbubby: Project Gasbuggy

Size: 2.5 “ (6 x 6 x 6 cm) cube of Lucite with the coin embedded in the center of the cube.

Surface Radioactivity: About 125 - 150 CPM.

Price: $400 Shipping: $15


© Pro Partners & Associates 2019